WEDDING INVITATION WORDING ETIQUETTE

wedding_invitation_wording_etiquette

As we talked about in our previous etiquette post, invitations should be kept simple and to the point. They should only include the host names, bride & groom's names, date, time, and ceremony location. We're sharing our knowledge below about the etiquette behind wedding invitation wording.

Host wording

We recommend always checking with the host before making your final decision on how to word your host line of the invitation. You want to make sure to be gracious to your host/s.

You have the option to list out each of the host's names, (for example: Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Adler), or if there are multiple parties hosting, such as both sets of parents and the bride & groom, it's okay to just say "Together with our families," as long as you have permission from your hosts.

Some examples of wording for your host line:
"request the pleasure of your company"
"would love for you to join them"
"invite you to celebrate with them"
"request the honor of your presence"

Bride & Groom's Names

Traditionally, the bride's name precedes the groom's, due to the tradition that the bride's parents host the event.

If the bride's parents are, in fact hosting and the bride shares their parents' name that is listed in the host line, her last name does not need to be included. However, it is customary to include the groom's last name.

The reasoning behind including full names within your invitation is for the guests who do not know you personally, maybe they're acquaintances to your parents or they know more than one John and Abigail. An exception to this rule is when you're having an intimate wedding where everyone knows the bride and groom personally and does not need that extra reminder of what their full names are.

Date and Time

Formal wedding invitations generally have everything spelled out, including the date, year, time, etc. (for example: "Saturday, the fifteenth of May," "five o'clock," "two thousand and eighteen")

The Location

Unless the name of your ceremony location will confuse your guests, the full address is not necessary. However, you should always include the city and state. A few examples of when you should include full addresses are: if the location is a home, doesn't easily come up on a search engine map, or if there are multiple locations with the same name.


While this information is helpful, we always recommend discussing your wording options with your stationer. Usually they will be able to offer you a couple of wording options that fit your circumstances. However, we wholeheartedly support new ways of wording things to fit your style. As always, we're an open book, so don't hesitate to reach out about your wedding stationery questions!

Xo,
C+A

p.s. For other tips or insight into wedding stationery & planning, click here and be sure to subscribe to our journal to receive updates straight to your inbox!