Posts tagged etiquette
HOW TO ADDRESS WEDDING INVITATIONS + A FREE TEMPLATE
wedding guest addressing

We're continuing our stationery etiquette series, giving you all of the details you'll need to conquer your wedding invitations without confusion. This post is covering the etiquette behind addressing your guests correctly, without offending anyone.

 

Married Couple

Mr. and Mrs. Jack and Anna Walton
or
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Walton

 

married couple with different last names

Mr. Jack Walton and Mrs. Anna Hamilton

 

unmarried couple living together

Mr. Jack Walton
Ms. Anna Hamilton
On separate lines

 

SAME-SEX COUPLE

Ms. Penelope Green and Ms. Amanda Holt
or
Penelope Green and Amanda Holt
Alphabetical order, or whomever is the closest acquaintance.

 

FAMILIES

Include parents' names and "and Family" afterwards
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Walton and Family
If there is only one child, include "and Miss Claire," or "and Maxwell" after the parents' names.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Walton and Miss Claire
Girls under 18, use Miss, boys under 18, do not use a title.

 

CHILDREN 18 & older

If children 18 and older do not live with their parents, they should receive their own invitations.
Ms. Claire Walton
or
Mr. Maxwell Walton

 

Married doctors

Doctors Anna and Jack Walton
or
Dr. Anna and Mr. Jack Walton
or
Dr. Jack and Mrs. Anna Walton

 

DISTINGUISHED MILITARY TITLES

Both captains in the military: Captains Anna and Jack Walton, US Navy
or
Different titles: Captain Jack Walton and Lieutenant Anna Walton, US Navy

 

We hope this information will help you navigate the task of addressing your guests. We have tried to include the most common circumstances that we're faced with, but please be sure to reach out if you have any additional questions. To help you even a little bit more, we've created an Excel document that will assist you in organizing your guest addresses. Download the free template here!

Xo,
C+A

p.s. For other tips or insight into wedding stationery & planning, click here and be sure to subscribe to our journal to receive updates straight to your inbox!

WEDDING INVITATION WORDING ETIQUETTE
wedding_invitation_wording_etiquette

As we talked about in our previous etiquette post, invitations should be kept simple and to the point. They should only include the host names, bride & groom's names, date, time, and ceremony location. We're sharing our knowledge below about the etiquette behind wedding invitation wording.

Host wording

We recommend always checking with the host before making your final decision on how to word your host line of the invitation. You want to make sure to be gracious to your host/s.

You have the option to list out each of the host's names, (for example: Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Adler), or if there are multiple parties hosting, such as both sets of parents and the bride & groom, it's okay to just say "Together with our families," as long as you have permission from your hosts.

Some examples of wording for your host line:
"request the pleasure of your company"
"would love for you to join them"
"invite you to celebrate with them"
"request the honor of your presence"

Bride & Groom's Names

Traditionally, the bride's name precedes the groom's, due to the tradition that the bride's parents host the event.

If the bride's parents are, in fact hosting and the bride shares their parents' name that is listed in the host line, her last name does not need to be included. However, it is customary to include the groom's last name.

The reasoning behind including full names within your invitation is for the guests who do not know you personally, maybe they're acquaintances to your parents or they know more than one John and Abigail. An exception to this rule is when you're having an intimate wedding where everyone knows the bride and groom personally and does not need that extra reminder of what their full names are.

Date and Time

Formal wedding invitations generally have everything spelled out, including the date, year, time, etc. (for example: "Saturday, the fifteenth of May," "five o'clock," "two thousand and eighteen")

The Location

Unless the name of your ceremony location will confuse your guests, the full address is not necessary. However, you should always include the city and state. A few examples of when you should include full addresses are: if the location is a home, doesn't easily come up on a search engine map, or if there are multiple locations with the same name.


While this information is helpful, we always recommend discussing your wording options with your stationer. Usually they will be able to offer you a couple of wording options that fit your circumstances. However, we wholeheartedly support new ways of wording things to fit your style. As always, we're an open book, so don't hesitate to reach out about your wedding stationery questions!

Xo,
C+A

p.s. For other tips or insight into wedding stationery & planning, click here and be sure to subscribe to our journal to receive updates straight to your inbox!

 

 

WEDDING STATIONERY ETIQUETTE

Are you planning your wedding with the recurring thought in your mind, "I have no idea how this is done, I've never been married before?" We know how you feel, in fact, we were in that exact place recently. It doesn't matter how many weddings you've been to, you'll never understand the details that go into a wedding until you're planning one yourself. I (Cassie) stood at the cake table on my wedding day, while everyone waited for us to cut the cake, whispering to my new husband, "how is this supposed to go?"

Needless to say, weddings are one big, overly detailed event that sometimes makes a bride want to pull her hair out. These posts are our way of serving you our knowledge so that you don't have to feel like an amateur anymore.

Our desire for this journal entry is to inform you of the details you need to think about when you begin your wedding stationery process.


When to send out Save The Dates

6-8 months. Make sure to only send out save the dates to people who will be invited, without a doubt.

When to send out invitations

6-8 weeks. This gives out of town guests plenty of time to make travel arrangements. If it's a destination wedding, give your guests more time by sending them out 3 months ahead of time. We recommend beginning the design process 4-6 weeks prior to the date you'd like to send them out.

How to choose a deadline for RSVPs

2-4 weeks in order to allow enough time to give your head count to the caterer and organize the seating arrangements. 

Invitation Information

Keep it simple. The invitation should only include the host names, the full names of the couple marrying, and the date, time, and location of the ceremony. Do not print extra information on the back of the invitation.

Spell it Out

You should always spell out words, such as, "street", "apartment", or state names. Numerals under 20 should also always be spelled out.

Registry info

You don't want to come off as asking for gifts, therefore we don't advise including your registry information on any stationery you send out. We do however encourage you to have close family and friends spread the word, as well as include these details on your wedding website.

Dress Code

You may include your dress code either in the lower corner of the invitation, on a details card, or on your website. Wording options include: Black Tie, Cocktail Attire, Casual Attire, etc. Whether you include dress code information or not, your invitation suite should reflect the formality of the event through the design and presentation.

Details

Make sure to give your guests all of the information they will need to plan for your wedding. We suggest creating a wedding website as the mobile hub for all of these nitty gritty details, and printing the URL on your small detail card. If you choose to print the URL, make sure to include a list of information they will find on your website to encourage them to visit it. This is an easy way to save money on extra suite pieces, and also make it easy on your guests so that they have access to this information wherever they are. However, if you have a lot of elderly guests, you may want to consider printing all of this additional info on a larger detail card, or multiple cards since they are probably not as technologically savvy.

Plus Ones

It is not required to include a plus one for every single guest you invite. Most guests should know if "and guest" is not after their name, they are not invited to bring a plus one. If you're having an intimate wedding, most guests should understand your reasoning.

Return Addresses

It is customary to include a return address on the back flap of the envelope. This address should be whomever's is designated to receive the response cards. This address should be printed on your response cards as well.

RSVP Postage

You should always include postage on your response cards. If not, you'll risk your guests not sending in their RSVP's due to the inconvenience of having to buy postage.

Thank you notes

Thank you's should be treated with a sense of urgency. Express your true appreciation in a timely manner by sending your gratitude within two weeks of receiving the gift.


We hope this has covered most of your looming questions about the basics of wedding stationery, and as always, feel free to reach out with any additional questions you may have!

Xo,
C+A

p.s. For other tips or insight into wedding stationery & planning, click here and be sure to subscribe to our journal to receive updates straight to your inbox!